1290 Super Duke R - SV1000 Portal
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post #1 of 79 (permalink) Old 21st May 2016, 01:16 PM Thread Starter
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1290 Super Duke R

Took delivery of a new 2015 KTM Super Duke R yesterday afternoon. It had 3 miles showing on the clock and is now at 29. I'll start pilling them on here shortly!

 photo Day1-3Miles.jpg

 photo 05202016-BRAND-NEW.jpg

A bit funny, I couldn't even get it off the dealer lot without doing the first mod. Had to have GP shift! Sato makes a shift plate to accommodate this so I installed it before even riding the nike for the first time! Yup, never even test rode it, just jumped straight in and bought it!

 photo Sato-GP-Plate-Install-Dealer.jpg

I'll get some miles put on it today after I familiarize myself with all the gadgetry and such that I now have access to in the clocks. Need to tweak the controls for comfort as well. More pics to come!
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post #2 of 79 (permalink) Old 21st May 2016, 02:18 PM
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That looks very very nice,enjoy it
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You`ll find it`s a better class of people who own BMW motorcycles
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post #3 of 79 (permalink) Old 21st May 2016, 03:47 PM
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First thing to learn to do is turn off all the electronic aids so it actually makes power. The bummer is that every time you switch the key off, it resets back to slow mode.

There is a KTM accessory dongle that you can plug into the harness that allows the last state to hold when the key goes off.

Once engine is in full power mode things happen pretty quickly.

-ms
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post #4 of 79 (permalink) Old 21st May 2016, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by schmidt314 View Post
First thing to learn to do is turn off all the electronic aids so it actually makes power. The bummer is that every time you switch the key off, it resets back to slow mode.

There is a KTM accessory dongle that you can plug into the harness that allows the last state to hold when the key goes off.

Once engine is in full power mode things happen pretty quickly.

-ms
It'll get there soon enough. Full Akra Evo system will be going on after Chris picks up the SV. That includes said dongle and SAS removal (same thing as the PAIR on the SV).
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post #5 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 02:53 AM
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A bit funny, I couldn't even get it off the dealer lot without doing the first mod. Had to have GP shift! Sato makes a shift plate to accommodate this so I installed it before even riding the nike for the first time! Yup, never even test rode it, just jumped straight in and bought it!
Well done! VERY nice little bike you got there. Kind of wish Suzuki had stayed in the game with the Twins and gone a bit bigger and better, but oh well....

Glad you're another GP shifter! I got mine inspected yesterday and mentioned to the Service Manager that it had GP shift and he looked at me like I was talking Swahili. After explaining the shift pattern he had a puzzled look and went over to tell the mechanic who would do the inspection. Guess this is something they don't see very often? The standard shift pattern always seemed backwards to me and the GP makes so much more sense. Good luck with the new bike!
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post #6 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 05:31 AM
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Todd, nice bike. Enjoy!
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post #7 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys!

Installed a Cox radiator guard yesterday before doing much else. Hate having an unprotected radiator. Then went to my buddy's place so we could get sag set and see where the clickers were all at.

The forks, even tho they are nice WP units, don't have an external sag adjustment, just rebound on the right fork and compression on the left. I'm still trying to determine if they have progressive springs in them too. Sag actually came out fine for street riding at 40mm. Rebound was a touch off so we took 4 clicks out of that to speed it up slightly and that seems to have worked so far. I'm still researching to see what is available to upgrade the forks some.

Rear shock is also a decent WP unit that has preload and high/low speed rebound and compression settings. Initial sag came out to 58mm so we had to crank it down a little to balance the bike out. So 40mm sag at the rear now as well. No changes to the clickers there yet. Seems good so far but I haven't had a chance to hit any real twisty roads yet.

Freeway ride is extremely smooth and bumps are not harsh at all which is why I am wondering if it's got progressive springs. Went for an easy ride up the coast with my friend on his 2007 Bonneville and my daughter and her boyfriend on his MV Turismo Veloce. Stopped at the local glider port to take some pics and watch the hang gliders and parasailers for a bit.

 photo 20160521_163220.jpg

 photo 20160521_163128.jpg

 photo 20160521_163155.jpg
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post #8 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
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Well done! VERY nice little bike you got there. Kind of wish Suzuki had stayed in the game with the Twins and gone a bit bigger and better, but oh well....

Glad you're another GP shifter! I got mine inspected yesterday and mentioned to the Service Manager that it had GP shift and he looked at me like I was talking Swahili. After explaining the shift pattern he had a puzzled look and went over to tell the mechanic who would do the inspection. Guess this is something they don't see very often? The standard shift pattern always seemed backwards to me and the GP makes so much more sense. Good luck with the new bike!
Yup, GP shift all the way! Both my track bikes are GP so it makes sense to me to try and keep all my bikes the same, otherwise I get a little confused. And as you said, it just feels more natural to me as well.
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post #9 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by xtremewlr View Post
Thanks guys!



Installed a Cox radiator guard yesterday before doing much else. Hate having an unprotected radiator. Then went to my buddy's place so we could get sag set and see where the clickers were all at.



The forks, even tho they are nice WP units, don't have an external sag adjustment, just rebound on the right fork and compression on the left. I'm still trying to determine if they have progressive springs in them too. Sag actually came out fine for street riding at 40mm. Rebound was a touch off so we took 4 clicks out of that to speed it up slightly and that seems to have worked so far. I'm still researching to see what is available to upgrade the forks some.



Rear shock is also a decent WP unit that has preload and high/low speed rebound and compression settings. Initial sag came out to 58mm so we had to crank it down a little to balance the bike out. So 40mm sag at the rear now as well. No changes to the clickers there yet. Seems good so far but I haven't had a chance to hit any real twisty roads yet.



Freeway ride is extremely smooth and bumps are not harsh at all which is why I am wondering if it's got progressive springs. Went for an easy ride up the coast with my friend on his 2007 Bonneville and my daughter and her boyfriend on his MV Turismo Veloce. Stopped at the local glider port to take some pics and watch the hang gliders and parasailers for a bit.



 photo 20160521_163220.jpg



 photo 20160521_163128.jpg



 photo 20160521_163155.jpg

I was also surprised to see no preload adjusters on the forks. As you also observed and I had helped set up, the rear sag was way too much in my opinion. We took several clicks of compression out of the front end because it felt really harsh over small bumps. This helped a bunch. The extra weight on the front due to rear preload set up also helped make the front more compliant.

I also liked the small detail of the marks on the upper chain guide to check chain tension also.

The rear suspension preload adjustments and a few low and high speed compression and rebound changes helps to get the thing to finish a corner on the gas and also chassis from pulling wheelies coming out of corners.

Ride it like you stole it!
-ms


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post #10 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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I was also surprised to see no preload adjusters on the forks. As you also observed and I had helped set up, the rear sag was way too much in my opinion. We took several clicks of compression out of the front end because it felt really harsh over small bumps. This helped a bunch. The extra weight on the front due to rear preload set up also helped make the front more compliant.

I also liked the small detail of the marks on the upper chain guide to check chain tension also.

The rear suspension preload adjustments and a few low and high speed compression and rebound changes helps to get the thing to finish a corner on the gas and also chassis from pulling wheelies coming out of corners.

Ride it like you stole it!
-ms
Some of the small details that KTM include are just cool, like the chain adjustment marks you mention and the chain guide wear indicator to let you know it's time for a new one before you damage the swingarm. The tool kit that comes with the bike is pretty decent as well and includes the hook spanners needed for adjusting chain tension and shock preload. Much better than what I have seen provided in most Japanese bikes tool kits!

And at least Austrians aren't light weight like the Japanese apparently are since we were able to dial the sag in front and rear pretty easily!

Oh, I also discovered they have guideline suspension settings on the underside of the OEM seat, along with a pictograph of how to use those markings to check chain tension. Tire information is also under there.

 photo 20160520_211220.jpg

 photo 20160520_211213.jpg

 photo 20160520_211205.jpg
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post #11 of 79 (permalink) Old 22nd May 2016, 08:52 PM Thread Starter
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Notice the spring preload settings they have. I thought it was interesting how they tell you to measure preload.

You have to back the adjuster all the way out and then tighten from there until the top of the spring is at the specified distance from fully loose to get the desired preload according to the chart. I guess it's an easy way to get in the ballpark if someone is doing it solo.
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post #12 of 79 (permalink) Old 23rd May 2016, 05:37 PM
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Nice ride!!!

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post #13 of 79 (permalink) Old 23rd May 2016, 05:42 PM
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Just looking at the rear tyre pressures,seems a bit odd that they are the same solo as they are with a pillion.

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post #14 of 79 (permalink) Old 23rd May 2016, 06:54 PM
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Just looking at the rear tyre pressures,seems a bit odd that they are the same solo as they are with a pillion.
I believe that all manufacturers recommend this tire pressure 36/42 in either case solo or with a pilion

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post #15 of 79 (permalink) Old 23rd May 2016, 07:27 PM
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I believe that all manufacturers recommend this tire pressure 36/42 in either case solo or with a pilion
I'm sure both my bikes are 36 36 solo,36 42 with pillion. I could be wrong but I doubt it
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