Mr. Schmidt’s “Setting cam lobe centers without adjustable gear sets” in action!!! - SV1000 Portal
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
coz
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Mr. Schmidt’s “Setting cam lobe centers without adjustable gear sets” in action!!!

Here it is! I successfully completed the procedure, which has totally transformed my bike, and I came back to tell the tale!

Bottom line is: It’s totally worth it, it truly transforms the engine’s performance, and it CAN be done by the uninitiated.

Here is the original link of the thread by Mr. Schmidt himself, who has provided a PDF outlining the math behind the procedure, and brief instructions: http://www.sv-portal.com/forums/5-tw...gear-sets.html He will also provide you (upon request) with a spreadsheet that’ll do all the calculations for you.

This procedure has been an emotional rollercoaster for me, I did stupid things, had the wrong tools, but with perseverance and creative thinking I managed to overcome all difficulties and get it done!!

Several notes to begin with:
  • Take a week off from work, especially if you’ve never done this before
  • Visually Inspect all bolts you’ll need to undo. If any of them have rounded edges or deformities of any kind, then a) buy new bolts, and b) get ready for the pain in the ass that is to unscrew damaged bolts
  • Get torque wrenches. Seriously. GET TORQUE WRENCHES. Good quality, certified ones. You’ll need to measure torques from 6 N/m to 140 N/m


So let’s get started! Mr. Schmidt says the procedure can be accomplished with the tank raised and the radiator on, but he is a seasoned engineer and I’m a newbie, and to me this is just unfathomable.

So, first job would be to lose the tank and radiator, both procedures are covered in the manual.

NOTE: wrap every connector and hose you unplug with paper tape and label it. You’ll be glad you did when you put the bike back together

So, here we are: tank removed, radiator removed.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
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Next you’d need to remove the rear cylinder rubber heat shield. Unhook all connectors, remove the tank base, then carefully slide it backwards until it’s completely off
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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Next up are the Throttle Bodies. Get ready for some potentially serious grief here! What the manual says is that you “loosen the throttle body clamp screws” and dismount the TBs… I WISH!!!

See what happened is (and if it happened to me it could happen to you) that the rubber pipes that connect the TBs to the engine had, over time, gotten completely rigid. I tried WD40, engine oil, running the engine to 100 degrees C, heat gun, nothing worked. I ended up pulling so hard I half-lifted the front wheel - and pulled a back muscle in the process. After that I went berserk on the TBs and the front one finally shattered to pieces like glass.

It was only sheer luck that the intake valves were at the closed position, or else bits of hardened rubber would have gone inside the cylinder… so I used compressed air to blow them out.

NOTE: therefore, if the TBs are giving you any grief at all, make sure the engine is at a position where intake valves are closed

The way to remove the TBs from the rubber pipes is this:
  • Heat them up
  • Pull the front TB at a 90-degree angle from the rubber pipe, at the same time wiggling it left and right, until it’s off
  • Do the same for the rear TB

And there you have it. Moral: a 5 min job could well take half a day

NOTE: stuff a piece of cloth or paper down the rubber pipes so no dust, dirt, or the occasional tool bit enters the engine
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:23 PM Thread Starter
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Next up is the rotor cover. To get this off you’ll need to remove the clutch slave cylinder (2 bolts)

NOTE: pull the clutch lever and tie it up with a zip tie. If you don’t, as soon as you remove the slave cylinder its piston will pop out.

Remove the speed sensor and sprocket cover.

Now it’s the rotor cover’s turn: undo the bolts and make sure you have a firm grip on it as the rotor's magnet pulls on the coil (affixed to the cover) with considerable force.

Use a piece of wire to hang the cover out of the way. Remove the starter torque limiter, started idle gear and its shaft (page 71 of the manual).

Remove spark plugs.

Remove both head covers.

That’s it, we’re now ready to fix the Degree Wheel!

NOTE: if you don’t already own one, choose the largest you can find. The larger it is, the more accurate the measurements.

Now comes the fun part of removing the generator rotor bolt. This sucker has the highest torque setting of any bolt you’ll come across as part of this job. For this job, you’ll need the “09930-44541: Rotor holder” special tool, OR, you can make do with a large adjustable wrench. The flat sides of the rotor are 32mm apart so choose your wrench accordingly.


Especially if this bolt has never been undone since the bike left the factory (as in my case) and you don’t have sufficient leverage (again, as in my case) get ready for the second largest force (rotor bolt is graded at 140 N/m) you’ll ever have to exert in your life…

Once the bolt is off, use a 20-30 mm spacer and use the bolt to affix the Degree Wheel to the rotor.
Now you need to tighten it up. What I did was to put the bike in 6th gear, put my foot on the rear wheel spoke to stop the engine from turning and gave it a good tug.

I am attaching a document from WebCams that explains how to find true TDC, and measure cam lobes, better than I ever could.

NOTE: You’ll need to make sure the piston is nowhere near TDC, before you screw the piston stop in… use a long (and very clean) screwdriver through the spark plug hole and rotate the engine. When the piston is at or near BDC, then screw in the piston stop.

Follow the doc’s instructions to find TDC.

NOTE: if you don’t have the special rotor holder tool, it’ll be impossible to loosen, rotate and tighten the degree wheel to true TDC. So, either move the pointer or use a marker to mark TDC on the wheel.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:25 PM Thread Starter
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Here's the WebCams document:
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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OK, so you’ve found true TDC.

Now comes the extremely tedious process of measuring valve travel or lift. Several things to note here:

  • You’re measuring from a set amount of lift all the way back to it. It could be 1 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.05 inches, doesn’t matter as long as you allow the valve to travel back to that threshold
  • Standard dial gauges on eBay usually come with a magnetic base. That’s utterly useless in our case: the entire engine and frame are made of aluminum. You’ll need to fabricate some sort of base that can be bolted to the engine and that the dial gauge can in turn be bolted on it. I made one out of an old PC case.
  • Standard dial gauges on eBay are short and have a stubby ball tip. Again, utterly useless in our case. You’ll need an extension and it’d be great if you also got a set of tips. Or you could do what I did, get just an extension, bend it, then weld a round-head nail on it, try it out, find out it’s too blocky, then remove it and weld a small bit of round-bottom hex key. But why do that to yourself? Just get a set or tips…
  • …but make sure the tip end is rounded. You don’t want to scratch the bucket
  • The tip MUST be able to touch the bucket (tappet) at an angle so that a) it can follow it all the way down its travel and then back up again, b) at the same time without the lobe touching it.
  • Intake valves are measured opening Before Top Dead Center (BTDC) and closing After Bottom Dead Center (ABDC), while…
  • …exhaust valves are measured opening Before Bottom Dead Center (BBDC) and closing After Top Dead Center (ATDC).
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
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There’s little more that can be said at this point. Arm yourselves with a lot of patience. A LOT. Seriously. Measure, re-measure, re-re-measure until you get consistent results. Three consistent (identical) measurements was my target. Multiply this by 2 valves (one intake and one exhaust), then multiply by 2 cylinders. That’s a lot of measurements, believe you me!


NOTE: on each exhaust camshaft there is a decompressor. It’s that bulky thing with a tiny spring on it (see 1st pic). Do NOT measure the lobe center on the exhaust valve next to the decompressor. For accurate readings, measure the exhaust valve on each cylinder WITHOUT a decompressor next to it.


SERIOUS NOTE: Be extra-super-mega careful with what you dangle over the cylinder head. Once you drop something all work must cease until you find it, else you risk damaging the engine in a variety or horrible ways. I dropped a 5mm pin (last pic) and spent 2 hours looking for it. It managed to go through the spark plug hole and inside the cylinder. I fished it out using a flexible magnetic pickup tool. Those 2 hours I swear I aged a whole year.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:39 PM Thread Starter
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Take half an hour to measure valve clearances at this point, even if your bike is not due yet…

Then remove all camshafts. Read the manual and be sure you understand the crankshaft and lobe positions that each pair must be removed on.

OK, so you’re all measured up, checked Mr. Schmidt’s magic spreadsheet, decided on a number of teeth to advance (or retard) the idler gear, and you’re raring to go!!

Before you go, you’ll need to prepare for what’s to come, the lesser of which is that the tensioners need to come off at some point (before the idler gear).


BUT, the front cam chain tensioner is obstructed by the starter motor lead wire, which in turn is obstructed by the oil cooler. So, off comes the oil cooler, off comes the lead wire.


The back tensioner is buried under the thermostat. The thermostat is not bolted on the engine; it’s just held there by 4 hoses. Disconnect the leftmost 2, and it’s out of the way!


Remove both tensioners as outlined in the manual.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:44 PM Thread Starter
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Now comes the fun part. Removing the idler gear shaft and advancing/retarding the gear.


NOTE: The idle gear shaft has 2 washers: a copper washer and a smaller, thrust washer. See page 91 (3-44) of the manual. When you’ve removed the camshafts, if you grab the idle gear and wiggle it along its shaft axis, you will notice it moves slightly. It is supposed to. And you’ll need to measure this gap. Have a look at the first picture in the next page (92 or 3-45). Apart from the fact that the idiots at Suzuki have installed the idle gear the wrong way around, then photographed it for our benefit, you can see where you need to measure this and how. Clearance should be between 0.15 and 0.25 mm.


These thrust washers are a bitch to get a hold of, so I had ordered myself the whole set. Turned out one clearance was exactly at 0.15 mm, but the other one was 0.11 mm so I changed the washer. I’ve got the rest of the set, if anyone’s interested.


NOTE: both idle gears must be removed when the engine is at TDC on the compression stroke. That means the position where you remove the front cylinder camshafts.


Front cylinder idler is pretty straightforward; use a 10 mm hex bit, crack its shaft loose. Be extra careful so the thrust washer does not fall inside the cylinder head.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:47 PM Thread Starter
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Rear cylinder is tricky. Mr. Schmidt lays out the steps very nicely in his instruction document, make sure you follow everything he says to the letter. And I did. Made the 25mm long hex bit, got my 10mm closed spanner. However, in my case it wouldn’t budge. I bent 2 chromium-vanadium spanners. Made a haphazard extension to gain more leverage, nothing. I had to go and buy a special $20 tungsten / hardened steel, and I was pulling with such force that when it finally gave way I hit my elbow on the left side clip-on so hard, I almost broke it.



Anyway, enough whining like an old lady. Once you’ve got the shaft off, the only thing that prevents the gear from falling inside the head is, well, the fact that the casting of the head gets narrower. This shouldn’t pose a problem with the front cylinder, anyway, due to its angle. It does pose a serious problem with the rear one though, so:
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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:49 PM Thread Starter
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COCK-UP ALERT!!!


Once you remove the rear idle gear shaft, the thing is a disaster waiting to happen! The slightest movement can un-hook the cam chain from the lower idle gear and then you’re in a world of pain. The only way (in my newbie, non-professional opinion) you can avoid this is to stick something like the end of a zip-tie underneath the lower idler gear, between the camshaft and the crankcase: Manual, page 75 (3-28) fourth image. You can see the lower idle gear for the back cylinder (with the cam chain on), right above the rotor.


Another way to avoid a cockup would be to mark both the cam chain and idle gear so you’ll know how to go back if need be. Do that but also block the cam chain from moving from the lower idle gear. You’ll be glad you did!
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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 24th January 2016, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
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That’s it! Put the idle gear shafts, tensioners, camshafts back according to the manual.

Use new gaskets for the tensioners, assembly lube on the camshafts. Rotate the engine by hand several times.

Re-measure the lobe centers, make sure you’re getting what the spreadsheet said. If not, then you did something wrong. Re-check and re-do. For instance, my rear cylinder’s lobes were all over the place after I retarded the idle gear. After the invaluable help of Mr. Schmidt himself, turned out that at some point I rotated the rear idle gear 180 degrees and f**cked everything up. The spreadsheet is the law! Re-did everything, re-measured and all was dandy!


Don't forget to balance the TBs and also adjust the TPS!



Cheers!



Andreas
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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 25th January 2016, 03:42 AM
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Congrats man...!! Great write up too.
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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 25th January 2016, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks!! It has been a blast and has helped me to better understand how the SV works... I also love it more now!!


If nothing else I have also seen how much ignorance/negligence there is amongst mechanics and motorbike workshops, at least where I live. Some of the bolts must have been tightened with over 10 times more torque than spec values. Tappet clearances were all over the place, although I had taken the bike to 2 different workshops the past year... TBs grossly unbalanced.


Just look at the rotor cover plug!!! I had to hit it with a chisel and sledgehammer to get it open. The threads were almost completely gone!!!


It was a hugely rewarding experience and I'd recommend it to anyone!!!
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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 25th January 2016, 06:49 PM
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Good job! I need to tackle this sometime myself. I have adjustable cam gears waiting tho.
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