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· KNEE DRAGGER
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5,238 Posts
Okay! thanks!

First, I realized my spring rate numbers were off:

Checking my notes and the Penske manual, the shock actually has a 400 spring in there, after changing from the original 475. Still... it's quite less than what you're running (500).

Also, my rear sag numbers were not accurate. I get confused... I mistakenly didn't lift the bike off the ground (as the Penske manual calls for "A"), but rather just lifted the rear gently and then lightly settled it for the first number. Then I hoisted my carcass on-board for "B".
So, (until I can get another couple of assistants), I can assume that my rear sag is likely over-limit, as with my (incorrect) method we got about 45mm.

LENGTH

I don't have a measurement for this. (I don't recall there being any installation problem from being too long... but this was three years ago).

Shock spacer... not familiar with this part; I have the Penske manual in front of me and can't see what this would refer to..(?)

I did buy this Penske 8975 off of Ebay, used.. so it's possible that the length or adjustments have been futzed-with... But again, I did have it rebuilt at Penske before use. Hmm.

But I DO recall one thing: last year I reduced the rebound in back to almost it's max (out)... and the handling (warble) improved noticeably.

Thanx guys!


It would be interesting to see what the eye to eye length is.

Fully extend rear and measure.
Set total sag to 30-32mm
Now measure unloaded sag. If the spring is in the zone I would expect you to see 8-12mm. If less or none, this can be a sign of spring being too light.

Having way to much total sag causes the rear linkage to operate in the higher rate region and also prone to blowing through the existing travel and hitting the bumper. This can make the bike feel extremely stiff, ride way into the travel along with wiggles that can happen in the chassis from heavy weight distribution on the rear. This is even further aggravated by a shock length that is too short. Then with such small sag in the front, makes more of an issue.

Just my 2 cents...
-ms
 

· Disturbed, very...
2003 SV1000S
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2,064 Posts
When i mentioned spacer, that was for the front forks.....

When you change from an OEM spring to others, the new spring is quiet often different in length, normally it will be
longer.
Stock fork springs are usually prorogressive style and are tightly wound at one end and the wire is thinner.

Because of the length difference, you cut the extra length of the new spring off of the spacer tube that is installed on top of the spring.....

The more openly wound thinner wire also displaces less fork oil, and therefore the oil height needs to be brought up (less air gap) to compensate....
 

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19 Posts
Right... I think I've got the fork oil level correct. Right now it's got the stock spacers in there... Sonic 1.0Kg springs..

Wintertime is almost upon us here in the US Northeast (today is warm, at 60 deg. F! Probably the last before we get heavy frosts and they muck up the roads with salt brine) so I should be able to get down with the suspension both front and back soon.

Uhm, for starting purposes... could someone provide me with baseline SAG numbers?
Txs!
 

· Disturbed, very...
2003 SV1000S
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2,064 Posts
What length are the Sonic springs ?

Stock springs for the 03 model, and i thnk all are the same, has a wear limit of 290mm minimum, and the Racetechs that i ran were 310 long, so i trimmed just under 20mm off the spacer.....(i thnk mine stockies were 292mm long)

Similar with the GSXR front end i am running now..... i think i had to take 8mm off....
 

· KNEE DRAGGER
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5,238 Posts
Right... I think I've got the fork oil level correct. Right now it's got the stock spacers in there... Sonic 1.0Kg springs..



Wintertime is almost upon us here in the US Northeast (today is warm, at 60 deg. F! Probably the last before we get heavy frosts and they muck up the roads with salt brine) so I should be able to get down with the suspension both front and back soon.



Uhm, for starting purposes... could someone provide me with baseline SAG numbers?

Txs!


For a regular street going SV1000
Forks at standard height in clamps.
With a 1.0kg/mm spring I would be setting total front sag starting point to 38mm. The soft top out springs give you a few extra mm to add in, so often 38-40mm is a good base line. If you have stiffer top outs installed that are the same length, set to 36mm.

On the rear
What shock length are you running? Is you unit ride height adjustable? I ask because if the shock is shorter than stock the rear will not work well and might feel overly stiff and chassis will behave weird.
Free sag if the spring is close in range should be 6-12mm range and a total sag of 30-34mm should be a good starting point.

-ms
 

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118 Posts
Instead of starting a new thread regaring bearings I'll first try my luck here. Front wheel and head tube bearings are standard sizing and I've picked up some SKF bearings.

However for the rear wheel, swingarm, and pivot I've not been able to find anything SKF that would fit. Anyone who if the only option is to pick up original Suzuki bearings? Everything is flooded with All Ball bearings, but something tells me they are not the best quality.

All bearings are still fine, however this season it did hit 40.000 km, so just for a peace of mind I'm gonna swap them before spring hits.
 

· Disturbed, very...
2003 SV1000S
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2,064 Posts
The rear wheel bearings are 60/28-2RS left and right, and the carrier is 62/32-2RS

SKF will have these spec bearings, they might have a different numbering, but doubtful
 
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118 Posts
Not sure why it was so difficult to find them - thanks for your help.

You know about the bolts for swingarm and pivot joint? I see the measurements are listed in part fiches, but SKF search did not return anything.
 

· Disturbed, very...
2003 SV1000S
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2,064 Posts
You know about the bolts for swingarm and pivot joint? I see the measurements are listed in part fiches, but SKF search did not return anything.
I assume by "bolts" you mean bearings... ha ha...

Yeah, the needle roller bearings are always a bit harder to find unfortunately.

You might find them by Googleing the size....maybe...and really, unless you can detect movement in the swingarm, they are probably fine.
You can tear it down and clean and regrease and put it all back in. But if you go the replace route, you have to change out the spcers at each end too, as the bearings
run on them.
My swingarm bearings are still good at the mielage on my bike.
 
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Damn autocorrect.
Thanks for you help and insight. Two years/10.000km back I'd did pull the needle bearing and regressed them.
Sounds like they shouldn't be my concern for a long long time then.
 
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