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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe I am having a fuel pump issue. I recently removed the PAIR system on my 04 SV1000S and of course recieved the infamous FI light. I researched several different forums which all advised that to get rid of this, one must instal a resistor to the wires that attached to the PAIR system, which will trick the bike into thinking the PAIR is still there. So I did just that. Started the bike up the next day and let it warm up for about 5min, hopped on and got about 1/4 mile down the road when it stalled out. White smoke began emitting from the Yoshi pipes and the ceramic resistor was burning hot and had melted, though the wires attched to it were fine. Upon re-starting the bike I noticed the buzzing noise that usually occurs when you turn the key to the "ON" position never stops buzzing. I tried to start the bike again only to have it stall once more. Has anyone had a similar issue or any idea what I may be facing specifically?
 

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No, but interested in your outcome.

What would happen if you just plugged the opening in the airbox but left the pair in place?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I could have done that but half of the advantage to removing the PAIR system is losing the extra 3 1/2 pds. I ended up just plugging the holes to the airbox.
 

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If it was smoking it sounds like the resistor couldn't dissipate the power and probably gone open-circuit, which would explain the FI light. I'd take it off and check it, and replace it.

Power (Watts) = V squared / R so assuming 12v and a 10k R, P = 144/10000 = .00144 W

Hmm, pretty small, to small to generate smoke - maybe the resistor was faulty or wrong value?

Did you check it was 10k ohms, not 10 ohms? A 10 ohm one would try and dissipate 14.4 watts - that needs a fairly hefty resistor!
 

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KNEE DRAGGER
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The resistance the ECM needs to see at a minimum is 24 ohm. I always use 15v for calculating stuff to make sure all stuff will be within spec. Nice thing is though is that the circuit needs to see a minimum of 24 ohms but can be much higher. I have used 1kohm resistors with success. This keeps the power dissipation much much lower so hear does not become an issue
-ms
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did not research the mechanics enough before I dove into this project head first. Just had the dealership run a diagnostic on the bike and my ECU is fried, as well as the Power Commander itself. I am not sure yet why the resistor failed, I made sure that I bought the 10ohm/15 everyone advised. The dealership quoted me $1,587.00 for the ECU but I found a used one on EBAY for $99. I am praying that the harness is not fried and won't fry my next ECU.

*What I have learned from this is that you can actually use the original coil within the PAIR system as the resistor, there is no need to purchase a replacement once you have removed the PAIR. Simply detach the coil and leave the wires connected, wrap with electrical tape and place it in a safe spot.*

This has been an expensive mistake for me but I appreciate the advice and help from you guys on this forum and we will all continue to learn from each other in the future.
 

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KNEE DRAGGER
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5,126 Posts
I did not research the mechanics enough before I dove into this project head first. Just had the dealership run a diagnostic on the bike and my ECU is fried, as well as the Power Commander itself. I am not sure yet why the resistor failed, I made sure that I bought the 10ohm/15 everyone advised. The dealership quoted me $1,587.00 for the ECU but I found a used one on EBAY for $99. I am praying that the harness is not fried and won't fry my next ECU.

*What I have learned from this is that you can actually use the original coil within the PAIR system as the resistor, there is no need to purchase a replacement once you have removed the PAIR. Simply detach the coil and leave the wires connected, wrap with electrical tape and place it in a safe spot.*

This has been an expensive mistake for me but I appreciate the advice and help from you guys on this forum and we will all continue to learn from each other in the future.
I would think directly connecting the wires might make stuff burn up too.
-ms
 
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