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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay guys and gals, I think I have stared at the wiring diagram long enough and taken enough readings to state...

I may have fixed the green connector problem!

Now, I don't mean that the work around by re-wiring is incorrect, I mean I think I figured out why it fries out and why Suzuki never changed the plug. I want somebody to check my work.

Get a wiring diagram and trace the wires coming from the rectifier regulator, specifically pay attention to the left most B/R wire. Notice that it goes un-fused to the green connector!!!! I know that this connection is NOT necessary because I cut it out of my bike when I re-wired my R/R to take a solid run directly to the battery for negative and the starter solenoid for the positive. My wiring setup puts a 30a fuse between the supply and the green connector. This would logically say that the connector is not the issue, but the direct supply from the rectifier regulator that is the culprit. If I am correct, then the current work around may do more damage then good, because you will still be feeding too many amps on to the actual ignition switch.

My bike has 32,000+ miles on it with original green connector on it. It will continue to have same connector until somebody proves my theory incorrect.
 

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I don't have my wiring diagram on this computer, but why would you fuse a ground connection? If the fuse blows, you have no ground.

FYI - I had this issue on my first 03 1000S but I "solved" that issue by wrecking that bike in an unrelated tankslapper ~4k miles on the odometer.

My current 03 has 35k miles and haven't had the issue - stock connector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is the wiring diagram.

I have no idea, what is up with it, but the diagram runs a double loop, I changed mine to single and have been that way for a bit now with no issues. And actually if you look at it, the wire is not a ground, it is an un-fused positive. It is black .... with a RED stripe.

The stock system has two + and two - wires going out and linking back together.
 

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AAAH - my eyes :pokey: Well, that's worse than trying to solve one of those maze kiddy puzzles.

That said, I just wanted to point out that a boatload of us (maybe even a s**tload) have done the green connector (or atleast ground connector) bypass and not one person has reported any problems.

Just sayin'... What kind of damage is supposed to happen if you send too much juice to the ignition switch? I guess the extra amps were enough to kill the green connector, but it's so far not been enough to do any damage to the ignition switch.

Of course, if your theory is correct then I'd perform some wiring surgery just to make things right.
 

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Getting stranded is the least of my worries... I don't want to end up like the OP (Jeff) and lose power in the corner and crash. I replaced mine some time ago with no ill effects. Mine was like new still.

Chris
 

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Hmm, I am looking at the diagram and it appears to me that both B/R wire are fused. The two leads are in parallel but run into a series fuse as shown in the starter relay picture.

If I am understanding what you have done correctly, you have now taken a current divider (two parallel B/R) with a 30amp series fuse and bypassed it. This would now allow a combined 60amps through those circuits which is way over the normal B/R wire1 + B/R wire2 = less than 30 amps before the fuse blows.

You have doubled your possible current load before the system pops, so lets hope you do not smoke any wires due to a fuse not blowing when it should.

-MS
 

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My wiring setup puts a 30a fuse between the supply and the green connector. This would logically say that the connector is not the issue, but the direct supply from the rectifier regulator that is the culprit.
Not really. The generator can't supply more then 30A anyway....

If you take a look at other wires going from the ignition switch, you see that
one (Br) is for the 'position' lights, one (O/R) goes straight to the ECU and one 'O' splits up - one branch goes to the fusebox, the other to the headlight switch, but then ends up in the fusebox as well.

Position lights and ECU really shouldn't overload the green connector. Headlights could, but these are fused (15A).

Hmm, I am looking at the diagram and it appears to me that both B/R wire are fused. The two leads are in parallel but run into a series fuse as shown in the starter relay picture.
That's not really true - this fuse goes to the + terminal of the battery.

If for example you'd short out the B/R wire on the ignition switch to the ground with the bike running, the connection between the R/R and the ignition switch is in deed unfused.

If I am understanding what you have done correctly, you have now taken a current divider (two parallel B/R) with a 30amp series fuse and bypassed it. This would now allow a combined 60amps through those circuits which is way over the normal B/R wire1 + B/R wire2 = less than 30 amps before the fuse blows.

You have doubled your possible current load before the system pops, so lets hope you do not smoke any wires due to a fuse not blowing when it should.
He connected the R/R directly to the battery, bypassing stock wiring. Which is not bad in itself, I guess. The current going from the battery terminal to the 'rest of the bike' is already fused with a 30A main fuse...

It won't help with the green connector problem, though.

My guess - a bad contact on the green connector (a manufacturing flaw, perhaps), causing a relatively high resistance on a small area - 10-15A flowing over that weak connection all the time will generate some heat... Add some arcing and there you are...

D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
take a look again, the B/R wire coming out of the Rectifier regulator is not fused to the green connector. It come from the R/R and does a Tee to the starter solenoid on the right and on the left it feeds the fuse box and then.... the green connector. The fuse is only coming out of the battery, once the bike is running the power coming from the R/R is uninhibited to the ignition switch, via the green connector. We all know that the Rectifier Regulator is prone to go out, one of the ways it can go out, is by over powering. Since the green connector is the first point of resistance, it cooks when over power occurs, while the rest of the system is protected by the battery and the 30A.

Another way it could happen is if the other power wire out of the R/R were to get corroded or break, the sole feed for the entire system is... through the green connector! That would increase the amp draw and with no fuse to stop it, burn baby burn.

I just see no reason to have power to the ignition from the battery (fused), and also directly from the rectifier regulator. What I have done is simply removed the one feed and ground from going directly. now every part of the bike is covered by the 30A fuses in the starter solenoid and the fuse box has the additional coverage as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This might help too. I edited the wiring diagram to show what I have done. I erased the lines I cut then put in a red for my positive and a blue for my negative. Notice how the 30A protects the green connector and it no longer has its own personal power feed... :bigclap:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you like it, give it a try, the link to the instructions is above, if you need a hand, send me a PM, my cell phone gets my notifications so I can respond asap.
 

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Suzuki changed that part of the wiring for the K5 - maybe they came to a similar conclusion?

Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Slope


They didn't quite go the same way - maybe they still want a 30A fuse between the battery and the R/R?

There are other changes - power supply for the headlights is routed via the starter button, that now has a contact in it's resting position. This way the headlights are turned off when the starter button is pushed.

The green connector supplies power for most of the bike except for the fuel system - that is powered directly from the B/R wire (before the green connector) over the fuse number 3 (10A) and the fuel pump relay - the fuel system includes fuel pump and injectors.


D.
 

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man there's a lot of misinformation in this thread ...

Get a wiring diagram and trace the wires coming from the rectifier regulator, specifically pay attention to the left most B/R wire. Notice that it goes un-fused to the green connector!!!! I know that this connection is NOT necessary because I cut it out of my bike when I re-wired my R/R to take a solid run directly to the battery for negative and the starter solenoid for the positive.
No, no, no. You cannot use the wiring diagram in the manual for this sort of stuff. It is a schematic representation only, you must use a diagram of the loom, which is reality. I posted one here somewhere. There are two B/R wires coming out of the R/R, they run in parallel and are crimped onto another B/R wire that runs between the green connector and fuse#3. That wire (between green connector and fuse#3) also has another two B/R wires crimped onto it that run to the 30A fuse, the other side of which goes to battery positive.

This would logically say that the connector is not the issue, but the direct supply from the rectifier regulator that is the culprit. If I am correct, then the current work around may do more damage then good, because you will still be feeding too many amps on to the actual ignition switch.
Again, no. There is no logic here to point to anything. All you did was re-route the connection between R/R and the battery. The current going throgh the green connector will not be affected. How do you know you solved anything at all? Some green connectors run fine for years.

I suspect that you are presuming that the R/R can supply large amounts of current (more than 30A) into the bike. Well, strictly speaking that is true, but it would require a short circuit somewhere. And since everything is fused, a fuse would pop long before the short-circuit current fried any connectors.

The real problem is that under normal conditions, the green connector is inadequate on some bikes.

the diagram runs a double loop, I changed mine to single
That fixes nothing related to the green connector. It simply replaces a pair of parallel wires with a single wire. I hope you used the right guage wire.


If I am understanding what you have done correctly, you have now taken a current divider (two parallel B/R) with a 30amp series fuse and bypassed it. This would now allow a combined 60amps through those circuits which is way over the normal B/R wire1 + B/R wire2 = less than 30 amps before the fuse blows.

You have doubled your possible current load before the system pops, so lets hope you do not smoke any wires due to a fuse not blowing when it should.
Sort of correct, but mainly wrong. Yes, he's bypassed the original connection between R/R and battery positive. That original connection consists of a pair of B/R wires in parallel from the R/R to a thicker B/R in the loom, to another pair of B/R wires that run to the 30A fuse, then to battery positive. Bypassing this is absolutely the right thing to do. But where do you get the 60 amps from? The current output of the R/R does not change. With a direct connection from R/R to the starter solenoid, the charging current from R/R to battery now does NOT go through the 30A fuse. But on the other hand, any current provided by the R/R to the rest of the bike now DOES go through the 30A fuse where as before hand it didn't.



If you take a look at other wires going from the ignition switch, you see that
one (Br) is for the 'position' lights, one (O/R) goes straight to the ECU and one 'O' splits up - one branch goes to the fusebox, the other to the headlight switch, but then ends up in the fusebox as well.

Position lights and ECU really shouldn't overload the green connector. Headlights could, but these are fused (15A).
Yes. Correct. The culprits in the green connector are the Orange and Red wires. The Red wire on one side of the green connector (key switch side) is a Red/Black wire on the other side (loom side). It doesn't matter about the fusing. I suspect the terminals in the green connector are apt to fry at currents well below the ratings of the fuses!

He connected the R/R directly to the battery, bypassing stock wiring. Which is not bad in itself, I guess. The current going from the battery terminal to the 'rest of the bike' is already fused with a 30A main fuse...

It won't help with the green connector problem, though.

My guess - a bad contact on the green connector (a manufacturing flaw, perhaps), causing a relatively high resistance on a small area - 10-15A flowing over that weak connection all the time will generate some heat... Add some arcing and there you are...
Again, all correct and true. My suspicion is that the engineer who drew up the blueprints wrote 20A on the specification sheet for the green connector. Then a fly shit on the blueprint so when the parts were ordered, they ordered 2.0A connectors instead. Stranger things have happened.

We all know that the Rectifier Regulator is prone to go out, one of the ways it can go out, is by over powering.
WTF? Where do you dig this tripe up from? The R/R is designed to dump FULL current ALL the time. That's how it regulates. Cheap and nasty, but that's what it is meant to do. Either it dumps power directly to earth or it sends power to the battery&bike, or both. Full power. All the time. They fail usually due to overheating I suspect (poor design), or possibly they shit themselves when they are unable to properly dump power to earth ... too many crimp joints in the loom between the R/R and earth ...

Since the green connector is the first point of resistance, it cooks when over power occurs, while the rest of the system is protected by the battery and the 30A.
Sorry, but this is tripe also. Kirchoff's laws shoot this to pieces. Once the current goes through the green connector, it goes through the ignition switch, back out the green connector, and then gets distributed to most of the rest of the bike. Using your logic, the ignition switch should fry as well.

Another way it could happen is if the other power wire out of the R/R were to get corroded or break, the sole feed for the entire system is... through the green connector! That would increase the amp draw and with no fuse to stop it, burn baby burn.
Nope. The green connector supplies all current for the bike anyway. (with the exception of the fuel pump and the injectors). A break in one of those B/R wires from the R/R will result in all the power from the R/R being forced down the surviving B/R wire. That's all.

I just see no reason to have power to the ignition from the battery (fused), and also directly from the rectifier regulator.
Well, it's cheap to manufacture. Ideally the R/R should have a direct connection to the battery, and the battery should feed the ignition switch. Suzuki shave a couple of bucks off production costs by splicing the R/R into the system between the 30A fuse and the ignition switch. It works OK, but not the ideal configuration.

What I have done is simply removed the one feed and ground from going directly. now every part of the bike is covered by the 30A fuses in the starter solenoid and the fuse box has the additional coverage as well.
Yes, that is all true. But it has no effect on the current through the green connector.

I edited the wiring diagram to show what I have done. I erased the lines I cut then put in a red for my positive and a blue for my negative. Notice how the 30A protects the green connector
No. All the 30A fuse does is prevent 30A from going through the green connector (and the ignition switch).


I like it.
I do too, but not for fixing the green connector problem. I recommend Obsidians modification purely because it makes a better connection between R/R and battery. Anything that bypasses the loom for this connection is good.

The green connector supplies power for most of the bike except for the fuel system - that is powered directly from the B/R wire (before the green connector) over the fuse number 3 (10A) and the fuel pump relay - the fuel system includes fuel pump and injectors.
Yes. Perfectly correct.
 

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here are two B/R wires coming out of the R/R, they run in parallel and are crimped onto another B/R wire that runs between the green connector and fuse#3. That wire (between green connector and fuse#3) also has another two B/R wires crimped onto it that run to the 30A fuse, the other side of which goes to battery positive.
It seems that's not true for K3 (and possibly K4) bikes.

I happen to have one spare wiring loom off a K3 bike and one of the B/R wires on the R/R connector IS NOT connected to the green connector's B/R wire - it goes just to the main fuse connector.

That doesn't change the rest of the matter, though.

D.
 

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I think I'll disassemble my green connector, clean and dielectric grease it. I should have some non-residue contact cleaner in the garage :)
If you go through the 1001 posts in the green connector thread you'll see dielectric grease doesn't do the trick. You simply need a bigger contact (different connector or direct connect with solder).
 

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interesting ... I'm not sure what year my looms are from - k7 think ... sounds like the earlier model wiring is superior!
Did Suzuki change the 'green connector' along with the wiring in K5+?

Can you take a close-up shot of it?

D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Oh crap.... deleted my whole post.... lol

Stared at the bike for a while longer and confused myself even more!!

There is a ton of possible draws off of that green connector and the whole dang thing makes no sense. That engineer must have been crazy to wire everything up that way! If you hit your passing light button while you are going really fast on a hot day (fan on) you could draw 64 amps before any fuse would go!! I can't find a single wiring guide that says its okay to put that kind of draw on anything smaller then 12 gauge!! The best chart I could find is here. I understand that is only under crazy circumstances, but it is obviously happening, or the connectors would not be burning up. I know normal is not over 30a or I would be popping that 30a fuse I have in line... so WTF?

I would really hesitate to hard wire past the connector with that in mind!

Hey Bozo.... any thoughts about where to put a relay in? I could not find your loom diagram.
 
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