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SV650 and DL650 are not encapsulated magnets. They are exposed and glued in a similar fashion. I have several failed 650 rotors here for those also. Even 2017 SV650s.

I am not sure if the last couple of years DL650 updated or not.

-ms
ms, maybe it is just the 2012 and newer DL 650? Probably should have checked closer. Pretty sure my 2012 DL 650 has encapsulated magnets.
 

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No, the entire rotor piece lol

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You need to remove the bolt in the center, then thread in the special puller https://www.denniskirk.com/28816.sk...5nCVJa0bHC_W2MFxBoCjuwQAvD_BwE&ad=45713335837

Do NOT try to remove the rotor without using the puller!!! And please read up a little on using it as the rotors are normally stuck on the crank very tightly and take some time and technique to remove successfully. An impact gun helps a lot.....give it a few hits then let it sit for a while. Few more taps and repeat until it pops off. Mine needed to sit overnight the first time before it popped sometime in the night.
 

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You need to remove the bolt in the center, then thread in the special puller https://www.denniskirk.com/28816.sk...5nCVJa0bHC_W2MFxBoCjuwQAvD_BwE&ad=45713335837

Do NOT try to remove the rotor without using the puller!!! And please read up a little on using it as the rotors are normally stuck on the crank very tightly and take some time and technique to remove successfully. An impact gun helps a lot.....give it a few hits then let it sit for a while. Few more taps and repeat until it pops off. Mine needed to sit overnight the first time before it popped sometime in the night.
Thank you very much for your help! Given how this route requires increased patience, can you replace the magnets with the rotor on the bike?

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People have repaired the magnets without removing the rotor....it's just more clumsy and difficult working on it while still attached to the motor. The JB Weld has magnetic particles in it that makes it tend to migrate away from where you want it to stay due to the strong magnetic fields present between the magnets. This is easiest to deal with when you have the rotor off and laying flat on a bench in front of you...but CAN be dealt with on the motor if you limit yourself to only gluing one or two magnets at a time, with them being positioned on the bottom for easiest access.

You mentioned 'replacing' the magnets....do you have some that are beyond being reattached? It seems they are a bit difficult to find and most people end up replacing the rotor if/when the magnets get fractured and destroyed. The puller tool isn't expensive and really needed if you ever decide that the rotor needs to be replaced, so when I did the JB Weld repair on mine (preemptively...none had come loose yet) I pulled it off so I could more easily work on it. Takes a fair amount of time for the epoxy to set up enough to stay put between the magnets so it was pushed back in place, rotate to the next gap and push that back then rotate to the next one and around and around we went until it stiffened up and would stay where it needed to be. Lots of fun!:) But it's only something you need to do once...so far we haven't heard of one failing afterwards.

JB Weld is made in a 'Quick' version that sets up in about 5-7 minutes which would be a lot easier to work with...problem is the temperature tolerance of it isn't nearly as high as the standard version that cures slowly and we have a fear that it might not hold up as well. There might be other epoxies on the market that set up faster and could tolerate the same heat as the standard JB Weld (about 500F) but I'm not aware of them. Good luck!:)
 

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People have repaired the magnets without removing the rotor....it's just more clumsy and difficult working on it while still attached to the motor. The JB Weld has magnetic particles in it that makes it tend to migrate away from where you want it to stay due to the strong magnetic fields present between the magnets. This is easiest to deal with when you have the rotor off and laying flat on a bench in front of you...but CAN be dealt with on the motor if you limit yourself to only gluing one or two magnets at a time, with them being positioned on the bottom for easiest access.

You mentioned 'replacing' the magnets....do you have some that are beyond being reattached? It seems they are a bit difficult to find and most people end up replacing the rotor if/when the magnets get fractured and destroyed. The puller tool isn't expensive and really needed if you ever decide that the rotor needs to be replaced, so when I did the JB Weld repair on mine (preemptively...none had come loose yet) I pulled it off so I could more easily work on it. Takes a fair amount of time for the epoxy to set up enough to stay put between the magnets so it was pushed back in place, rotate to the next gap and push that back then rotate to the next one and around and around we went until it stiffened up and would stay where it needed to be. Lots of fun!:) But it's only something you need to do once...so far we haven't heard of one failing afterwards.

JB Weld is made in a 'Quick' version that sets up in about 5-7 minutes which would be a lot easier to work with...problem is the temperature tolerance of it isn't nearly as high as the standard version that cures slowly and we have a fear that it might not hold up as well. There might be other epoxies on the market that set up faster and could tolerate the same heat as the standard JB Weld (about 500F) but I'm not aware of them. Good luck!:)
Wow - really incredible write up and I truly appreciate your support with this task! I bought my '03 1k last year abs everything had been running well. While I have it taken apart for the winter, I figured that I'd check on this and tackle re-attaching the magnets. Hope none are destroyed beyond repair.

I will purchase the puller and make sure to remove the rotor for the best results /easiest method.

Thanks,
John

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I am looking at my SFV rotor and noticed it has punches in the outer circle going inside to keep the magnets in place. Does the 1000 rotor have these? Never hear about a SFV magnet shift. :HMM:

Looking at the microfiche it seems the 1000 does not have the indents.

This is the SFV rotor...
 

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Nope, you are looking at the wrong place. Around the back outside by the #2. You can see them on the inside too towards the back and on each side of the magnets, one indent for the center of the magnet also. Pickups are sticking out and in the middle of the rotor.
 

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Check this site out if you need magnets www.madv8.com . Just ordered a set of 4 for $25 shipped! PITA to find them anywhere else. I had 3 that were shattered and I'm doing the clean up right now. Damn magnetic debris EVERYWHERE! At least I shouldn't have to revisit this once it's done.

After everything I've done to this bike, I guess it makes sense that I should have to make this fix too ?

Can't wait to post pics, eventually I'll get this thing roaring again better than ever!
Thanks to Junkie, I've got a killer looking exhaust that's light and freshly repainted.
 

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I am looking at my SFV rotor and noticed it has punches in the outer circle going inside to keep the magnets in place. Does the 1000 rotor have these? Never hear about a SFV magnet shift. :HMM:

Looking at the microfiche it seems the 1000 does not have the indents.

This is the SFV rotor...
No....the 1K's don't have such indents...which really does look like a good idea! Some of the early rotors have holes spaced between the magnets which we were thinking was intended for oil drainage but could be employed with machined bits screwed into them to hold the magnets. Late model rotors are smooth inside so barring drilling such holes we're left with epoxy. I guess if someone was good with a TIG you could add tabs inside to help hold things in position but it seems that the JB Weld does the job well enough to not need such a thing....but it wouldn't be a bad idea.
 

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No....the 1K's don't have such indents...which really does look like a good idea! Some of the early rotors have holes spaced between the magnets which we were thinking was intended for oil drainage but could be employed with machined bits screwed into them to hold the magnets. Late model rotors are smooth inside so barring drilling such holes we're left with epoxy. I guess if someone was good with a TIG you could add tabs inside to help hold things in position but it seems that the JB Weld does the job well enough to not need such a thing....but it wouldn't be a bad idea.
So literally once you jb weld the magnets in place, the idea is to put some jb weld in between the magnets to ensure they don't move out of place?

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The failures seem to happen to just one magnet at first which then rams into the next one and in time more break loose...so the thought that tying all of them together would be a good thing as all the bonds would need to fail before anything moved out of place. This has worked well (so far...knock on wood :))

A fillet of JB Weld between each magnet braces them all together into a unit and also makes it easier to keep the balance even. I filled about 3/4 depth *inward* of the gaps then used a Dremel sanding drum to bevel the top down (concave) to the edge of the magnet on each side. This kept the balance well with no vibrations and is pretty much foolproof to do.
 

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I suppose the next thing I could try is to see if the SVF rotor will fit onto the SV1000 crank? Check alignments, pickups, etc. Then see if the stator will swap over?

That's pretty ambitious. :lol:
 

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I suppose the next thing I could try is to see if the SVF rotor will fit onto the SV1000 crank? Check alignments, pickups, etc. Then see if the stator will swap over?



That's pretty ambitious. :lol:


Crank ends are smaller on the 650.

There are a couple of other rotors that might swap in from my work. The big issue is the phase offset between the key and poles on the unit. You would have to relocate the crank position sensor or cut a new key way.
-ms
 

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Well since I'm bored I measured the SFV rotor. OD is 131 mm and it has 22 pickups (7mm x 5mm. 1.6 mm high) and the back side of the taper has a 26.7 mm diameter, 29 mm deep. Keyway is 4 mm located between 2 pickups. 109 mm across the magnets ID.

Of course you have to get the starter clutch to work too. OOoof.

SV1000 K5 and the SVF rotors. You can't see the SV rotor has a much larger taper size. Puller is the same size though.
 

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