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I've seen bigger...
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OHHHH!!! I wanna say the word sooooooooooooooo bad!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

but I'm not gonna..... i'm gonna be nice.... maybe....







ok, I have my composure now. I never EVER use the rear brake unless i'm sitting still to keep me from rolling or i'm doing figure eights in a parking lot (slight brake pressure, friction zone with the clutch and a little rpms and you're money).

To use the rear brake on the street over 10mph is just suicide due to the higher risk of locking it up. it doesn't take much and I will laugh at the retard who skids out when they do it (trust me, I did it to a friend of mine).
 

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A #1 Squid
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you cant just keep your feet on the pegs without braking? lol
You know how everyone creeps forward a stoplights? It's so frustrating because you can't just stop and wait till it turns green or people get ancy. So you slow WAAAYYY down and creep along, the rear brake provides resistance from the rear allowing you to maintain balance much easier when you're going .5-1 mph.

I also adopted a lot of rear brake usage from riding two up. Bad secondary riders make you rethink how often you want to use the front. Engine Braking and with light front and rear when creeping down to stoplights.

I've locked the rear a few times on my own and felt it worm around, easy to control once you get the hang of it. I can't understand why people are so afraid of this. It's the same thing as it breaking lose when you're in the throttle, one is going faster than the pavement, the other slower. I've never slammed the rear in the twisties, no reason to with the SV. All of my "sliding" experiences have been from riding straight, mostly slowing down to stoplights.
 

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hmmm... you can really tell who has taken an advanced safety course and who hasn't....




:blink:
 

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For a solo sportbike rider on dry, flat pavement and good tires, the front braking % is close to 100 because you can lift the rear off the ground with hard braking. There are many variables which will change this, passenger or load at rear, wet or slick surface, tire temp and quality, and hills will reduce the amount of braking the front tire can handle and increase the % of rear brake power.

I try to use the rear brake all the time because I believe it is safer to make it a habit. In an emergency situation, you are relying on instinct, there is no time to think, therefore using the rear brake must be habit. If it's dry and flat and I'm alone, using the rear brake will not hurt if the wheel is airborne, but if it is slick, or the rear is heavy, not using the rear will extend braking distance, sometimes a lot.

Locking the rear brake will not make you go sideways if you are going straight or make you highside. I raced Supermoto and learned it is pretty easy to skid the rear tire for long distances in perfect control, not always faster, but pretty easy. Many roadracers also use the rear brake to slide a bit on turn in to help initiate the turn, or to tighten the line mid-turn. These are advanced uses and I do not recommend trying it on the street. But I do highly recommend using the rear brake regularly, it could save your life. JMHO
 

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:HMM: Well some sound advice from an ex racer has stood me in good stead! As has been said above, the use of the back brake can help you balance the bike in cornering. If you apply a good bit of front brake when cornering, the gyroscopic effect comes into play and wants to stand the bike back upright as opposed to the rear which will help the bike tip in with the slowing effect. However, only when applied properly! So get out there and practise as you would to learn any other good advice from those in the know!:punk: No jumping on it now!:blink:
 

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I'm guessing i'm the only person that will very occasionally use the rear brake to shave off a couple mph in a turn. Very very light application, but it works pretty good. I also used the mess out of it the one time I found myself on 5 miles of dirt roads to no where. :)
Yep, there's plenty of times when it's a useful tool.

To use the rear brake on the street over 10mph is just suicide due to the higher risk of locking it up.
What a load of rubbish.
 

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I personally use the hell out of my rear... on the street, it helps me bleed off speed when comin' into a corner a bit fast. On the track, it helps me stabilize the rear when I "accidentially" slam into 1st and get the rear hopping...
 

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Mmmm Kate
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I STILL love twins!
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Straight to the point but I have to agree. :)
To add, if you do not know how to use your back brake it is best not to touch it. If it was suicide to use they just would not put a back brake on bikes.

In the advanced MSF course (at least the one I took) they had you stop just using the back brake and even had you lock it up. No one went down.
 

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Heh, you won't learn by ignoring it :lol:

It's good for heaps of stuff... dipping the front end a little before getting on the fronts, controlling the mad rear wheel on crazy down shifting into cornerns... locking the rear up to bring the bike in supermotard styles... settling the rear suspension... bleeding some speed when you don't want to compromise front grip :D
 

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In the advanced MSF course (at least the one I took) they had you stop just using the back brake and even had you lock it up. No one went down.
Exactly. And in that class there was a video that showed that you can stop in a significantly shorter distance using *both* brakes rather than just the fronts. That not only includes a panic stop situation, that especially means in a panic stop situation. That nonsense about getting the rear end in the air has little application for the street. (That extra dozen feet or so may be the difference between hitting something hard or not.) However, properly using the rear brake takes training...and practice. That's what the Rider Course is all about.

You can get yourself in trouble with the rear brake, but you can also get yourself in trouble simply riding a motorcycle if you don't know what you are doing.

I know just what "Ski" (first post in this thread) is saying. When I got my SV1000 I was very impressed by the front brakes, and underwhelmed by the rear brake. The rear brakes were weak and had no feel. I wanted both my brakes to perform well. So I replaced the brakes lines (front and rear) with stainless steel braided lines. That didn't help the rear brake much. So I got a pair of EBC HH-rated rear pads. That helped!
http://www.oneidasuzuki.com/store/parts-accessories/ebc-rear-brake-pads-sv1000.html

I really enjoy having powerful brakes front and rear. Its akin to having a powerful motorcycle and knowing that you have tons of power to have fun with, but that if you open the throttle too much, at the wrong time, that you can overdo it. It's the same with the brakes. Use them judiciously and you can really haul 'er down quickly. Get stupid with the brakes and you can get in trouble. Good riders train (and practice) to get the most out of their brakes in every situation.
 

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:bigclap:

I use mine for staying stopped on a hill. I don't think they have any value beyond that use.
Well, I'm reading this post, but..., My rear brake doesn't even hold me in plase on a hill... And that's troubling... Just looked of I had air in the brakeline, but that was good...
I Think I'll try installing new pads... but what is the minimal thikness for a rear brake rotor??? The Front tels me 4.5mm ... on the rear I fond nothing.
 

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I rebuilt my rear master cylinder but she still barely does anything. Will stop at a red light drifting very slowly or hold it steady on a hill but thats about it. Not sure about minimum rear pad thickness.
 

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Disturbed, very...
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Well, I'm reading this post, but..., My rear brake doesn't even hold me in plase on a hill... And that's troubling... Just looked of I had air in the brakeline, but that was good...
I Think I'll try installing new pads... but what is the minimal thikness for a rear brake rotor??? The Front tels me 4.5mm ... on the rear I fond nothing.
The rear disc minumum is also 4.5mm according to the manual...

The rear brakes on these bikes, (same on my old VTR), is there for looks.....(yup says the inspector, they fitted brakes to the bike....tick)...not much else.......
It will stabilise the bike into a bend, and has the uncanny knack of being able to wear the pads out, even though there seems to be no real relationship between the pad and disc
in terms of friction...... :LOL:

I have toyed with the idea of putting a kit through the rear master cylinder to see if that helps....but i fear it wont help
 

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An effective rear brake is always worth having, but like all aspects of riding a motorcycle it requires a degree of skill to get the best from it. Rear brake, like a throttle, if you abuse it, will bite you in the bum. Use it properly and it is a useful tool. 30% of your braking force is an awful lot to just dismiss as 'Oh I never use that'. I know under HUGE braking the rear lifts from the road, but how often does that happen? Be honest.

On my rear brake, I have Stainless braided hose, and EBC HH pads, and my rear brake actually slows the bike down, I nearly always use both brakes even when riding hard, but in slow turns, parking etc, I use just the rear.
If you have cleaned up the pad faces, bled the system, cleaned the piston, and it's still not strong, then try hanging a weight on your brake pedal over night to keep the fluid compressed, it will 9 times out of 10, feel stronger the next day.
Had new pads and rear brake felt anemic
Did a series of rear brakes only , wipe say 20k off From 100
At first hardly slowed then started to bite and took more care
On another occasion with old pads it felt lacing,did a mega bleed at and at first fluid seemed ok then had lots of really baby bubbles
The new fluid was different colour and I kept bleeding till the new colour came close to what was going in then bled the same amount of new fluid through again, feel was very direct then
I find the response off a closed throttle can be abrupt so I try to leave v small amount of throttle when I back off and use back brake to nuetralise
Then to accelerate its off the rear brake and throttle on
Suits me anyway
 
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