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My 2005 Sv1000 has a 16t front sprocket and standard rear and when my GPS shows 100kph the speedo is showing 121kph.
Have bought a Sigma Sport BC509 bicycle computer and fitted it to the SV. The BC509 is an inexpensive device that will supply speed, distance and time by using a sensor that is fitted to the front wheel of a bicycle. With a little imagination it can also be fitted to a motorcycle front fork. You measure the circumference of your front wheel and calibrate the device using the value. Had to buy a rare earth magnet that was glued into one of the holes on the front disk mounting using silicon sealant . The sensor detects the magnet as it passes on each revolution. The magnet replaces the part supplied in the kit which is meant to fit onto the bicycle spoke. Haven't tested it yet but will as soon as the weather improves.
This site has a explanation but i fitted the magnet into one of the 10.5mm holes and used cable ties to clamp the sensor to the fork. Cost $39 in Australian dollars.
http://www.jackphelps.com/vstrom/sigmasport.htm
 

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International dogsbody
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my bike is off by 10%.


I think it sucks though that most bikes come out of the factory this way. Why don't they just fix that problem? So IF I ever go to sell the bike, let's say it says I have 10,000 miles on it, it really has 9000 miles on it.
I think all vehicles have optimistic speedometers but the SV's seems more optimistic than most.
It's to stop the manufacturers getting lawsuits from our speeding fines.
i.e. if you get caught you must have been well over thhe limit on your speedo and should have known better (not to get caught that is ;))
 

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my bike is off by 10%.
I think it sucks though that most bikes come out of the factory this way. Why don't they just fix that problem? So IF I ever go to sell the bike, let's say it says I have 10,000 miles on it, it really has 9000 miles on it.
no, the odo is actually very accurate - only the speedo is inaccurate

but of course if you change sprocket ratios then the odo will not be accurate

cheers,
 

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No Doubt - rjk

That's literally going through my mind every minute I'm on a freeway! I'm always figuring the %'age with regard to my speed. I black taped my GPS to my triple after I went down a tooth on the counter shaft since the error was obvious at that point - 17% OFF!! Which means it was off at LEAST 10% before -probably more. It's a pain in the ass. Why Suz went with a shaft pickup instead of the front wheel, I don't know. Only makes it worse for guys that change gearing. And I can't bear to blow $115 for the corrector box!
 

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She shoots, what a !!!!!
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That's literally going through my mind every minute I'm on a freeway! I'm always figuring the %'age with regard to my speed. I black taped my GPS to my triple after I went down a tooth on the counter shaft since the error was obvious at that point - 17% OFF!! Which means it was off at LEAST 10% before -probably more. It's a pain in the ass. Why Suz went with a shaft pickup instead of the front wheel, I don't know. Only makes it worse for guys that change gearing. And I can't bear to blow $115 for the corrector box!
Not sure how long you have had your SV, but eventually you just know, either that or just use your GPS. Suzuki did what they did as a weight savings more or less.....
 

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With a 16t front and standard rear my speedo showed 121kph when the GPS was 100kph. I have now changed to a 17t front and also fitted a Sigma Sport BC509 bicycle computer. This is a small electronic device that is meant to be fitted to a push bike and provides time, speed, distance.
The big plus is that it is cheap, easily calibrated to the diameter of your front wheel and can be adapted to fit a motorcycle.
I fixed the sensor to the front fork using cable ties. The magnet that trips the sensor cannot be fitted unless you have a spoked wheel. I bought two 10mm x 3mm rare earth magnets from an internet shop and glued them into one of the holes in the disk carrier using silicone sealant.
I can now report that it works very well and is very accurate when compared with my Garmin GPS. The unit is quite small and can be mounted on the handlebars.
My speedo now reads 110kph when the Sigma says 100
Have a look at the images.

http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm276/gdonald-photos/sigmasportfrontfork.jpg
http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm276/gdonald-photos/sigmasportinstrument.jpg
 

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Conversion factor for Speedohealer

Just got in a Speedohealer to install and need to know if anyone knows what the exact conversion factor is for stock gearing and stock tire size. I know it's usually 5% to 5.5% for most Japanese bikes, but don't have a GPS to confirm. Bike is an 05 SV1000S. Thanks in advance! :unsure:
JC
 

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Waiting to go for a boat ride
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Just got in a Speedohealer to install and need to know if anyone knows what the exact conversion factor is for stock gearing and stock tire size. I know it's usually 5% to 5.5% for most Japanese bikes, but don't have a GPS to confirm. Bike is an 05 SV1000S. Thanks in advance! :unsure:
JC
Make sure you do a search... Here's a perfect thread for you to read.

Heck, just the first few posts answer your question.

Check the SH site for install instructions with pictures. It's actually my bike from YEARS ago. lol

Chris
 

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Speed Conversion

If I'm reading all the posts properly, it seems like the conversion is somewhere between 8%and 10%. That's a bit more than all the other bikes I've owned so will try and get a GPS on board to determine 'actual'. Current GPS devices are damn accurate.
JC
 

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Hardtail Racer
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952 Posts
Over the last 35yrs + of riding / driving i've managed to calibrate my brain to within 10% of speed limits (30/40/50/60/70) & cross check on the general traffic flow. :whistle:
Pushing it well over 70 is more a survival issue given road/traffic conditions & points on licence a secondary consideration. If speed limit compliance is the main focus then buy a cruiser / moped :pokey:
 

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No compliance issues here I assure you. Just trying to be able to verify top end speed accurately without a GPS. Couldn't hurt to know when looking what your 'correct' speed is either, eh? :pokey:
 

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75mph on my bike and 64mph on wife's car. (No wonder people were passing me like I was sitting still.)

65mph on my bike and 55mph on wife's car.

55mph on my bike and 46mph on wife's car.

45mph on my bike and 38mph on wife's car

30mph on my bike and 26mph on wife's car.

A whopping 14% off.

I could understand a 2 or 3% difference, but 14% is rediculous. I really don't care for doing math while riding, takes the enjoyment out of it.
 

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KNEE DRAGGER
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75mph on my bike and 64mph on wife's car. (No wonder people were passing me like I was sitting still.)

65mph on my bike and 55mph on wife's car.

55mph on my bike and 46mph on wife's car.

45mph on my bike and 38mph on wife's car

30mph on my bike and 26mph on wife's car.

A whopping 14% off.

I could understand a 2 or 3% difference, but 14% is rediculous. I really don't care for doing math while riding, takes the enjoyment out of it.
I just crunched the numbers you have posted here. I see as high as 19.6% and as low as 15.4% difference when using the car speed as the reference. If you average these out I get 17.6%. So a couple of things here. Either something is pretty messed up on your bike or the gearing has been changed. If you subtract out the about 8.5% or so that a stone stock bike would show that leaves you with 9.1%. So now take a look at a gearing chart and look for a common sizing that would give about 9% difference from stock. 16/41 is 8.9%. So when using your average number from your data above I would guess your gearing has been changed to 16/41. If you use the highest value from your data above your gearing linesup with 16/42 and if you use the lowest value you are pretty dang close to 16/40

What is your gearing? Have I guessed correctly?

-MS
 

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I just crunched the numbers you have posted here. I see as high as 19.6% and as low as 15.4% difference when using the car speed as the reference. If you average these out I get 17.6%. So a couple of things here. Either something is pretty messed up on your bike or the gearing has been changed. If you subtract out the about 8.5% or so that a stone stock bike would show that leaves you with 9.1%. So now take a look at a gearing chart and look for a common sizing that would give about 9% difference from stock. 16/41 is 8.9%. So when using your average number from your data above I would guess your gearing has been changed to 16/41. If you use the highest value from your data above your gearing linesup with 16/42 and if you use the lowest value you are pretty dang close to 16/40

What is your gearing? Have I guessed correctly?

-MS
That's assuming the car's speedo is accurate - which is rarely the case (my Subaru reads about 9-10% high - pretty much the same my SV).

Most cars I've checked so far (using GPS as a reference) have either 8-10% relative error or about 5 km/h absolute error.

D.
 

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KNEE DRAGGER
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That's assuming the car's speedo is accurate - which is rarely the case (my Subaru reads about 9-10% high - pretty much the same my SV).

Most cars I've checked so far (using GPS as a reference) have either 8-10% relative error or about 5 km/h absolute error.

D.
My dads truck (Toyota) and our car (Saab) are about 2.5%. I would tend to believe a car speedo much more than a bike in general.

-MS
 
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