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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a new member with an Australian delivered 2003 SV1000S. I am submitting this post in the hope that it may prove of some value.
For some weeks I have been chasing a fault which had my bike misfiring under load below 5000rpm, even occasionally backfiring through the airbox. As I continued to try to determine the source of the problem I checked the usual things like the TPS, fuel pump, notorious green plug etc.
My efforts occasionally had undesired effects such as the bike cutting out the moment I touched the throttle to come off idle after start up.
I was beginning to think it was an earthing issue and luckily it happened that I was finally not able to start the bike at all (it would turn over with the starter motor but not start). I say luckily because it was no longer an intermittent problem.
During all of the above the bike showed no error codes when in dealer mode.
The problem turned out to be a loose electrical connector which finally disconnected fully (and which I fortunately noticed when checking another connection). The loose connector permitted me (generally) to ride the bike but presumably vibration at lower revs under load made the connection less stable.
The offending plug is located (hidden) to the left hand side of the battery box under the top rail of the rear sub-frame. It is a slim two pin connector adjacent to the larger three pin connector associated with the charging system. To access the plug I had to take out a few of the screws which hold the lhs tail section cowl then carefully bend the cowl out to reveal the two connectors which exit the wiring loom at that point. Neither plug could separate if properly plugged together so I can only assume that the two pin connector was never properly plugged up.
I have only been for a quick ride and there was no sign of any problem thus far so I am pretty sure it was the source of my issues.
My final comment is that I think there is a special place in hell reserved for the designers of the wiring harness routing on the SV1000 not to mention the electrical connectors which often had me tearing out my hair trying to figure out how to separate them. I never did manage to separate the 'green' connector but luckily it showed no signs of scorching.
Anyway, I add this post in the hope that it may suggest one more check to make before burning their SV to the ground out of sheer frustration. I was not far from that point!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Krad. A good experience to share which may help one of us in the future. Where about you located? I am in Albion Park just south of Wollongong.
Hi Muzza.

There is a lot of good information on the net about the SV so adding to it was my aim. Just today I took the stator cover off the bike to see if the magnets on the flywheel rotor had 'migrated'. They have not so I have left sleeping dogs lie and put the cover back on without slapping JB Weld between the magnets.
I live in D'Aguilar just N of Brisbane. D'Aguilar is at the base of curvy hotmix climb to Mt Mee. This makes owning the SV quite rewarding as they are truly fun bikes in that role as I am sure you know. I have however been riding for over 50 years so between my aversion to sliding down the road, the capabilities of the bike and modern tyres, and the speed limit on the road up the range, I come nowhere near the ragged edge these days.
The problem detailed above did seriously have me entertaining parting out the fuel injected SV1000 and buying a carburettor equipped SV650 'curvy' (1999-2002) or even a gen 2 GSX750F with its carbs, gravity fed fuel and oil cooling. Namely, I was willing to sacrifice power for simplicity. But the SV has been forgiven - for now at least.
 

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Krad, that 2 pin connector is the crankshaft position sensor harness.....
Runs ou tof the stator housing side by side wit the stator loom, which is the big 3 pin plug you mantioned.....no wonder crap was happening....

The fun killers have kept me away from the hotmix up there for ages now.....should do a run up through there to Mapleton and back down through Kenilworth for a day trip i think.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Krad, that 2 pin connector is the crankshaft position sensor harness.....
Runs ou tof the stator housing side by side wit the stator loom, which is the big 3 pin plug you mantioned.....no wonder crap was happening....

The fun killers have kept me away from the hotmix up there for ages now.....should do a run up through there to Mapleton and back down through Kenilworth for a day trip i think.....
Thank you for that advice regarding the 2 pin connector ML. I was thinking about pulling the cowl aside again to look at the wire colours to determine which circuit it was but laziness got the better of me.
You are tougher than me if you do day rides on an SV. I do not think my kidneys would survive especially given the state of the roads after recent rains. That is what my ST1100 (ex cop bike) and KLR650 are for :) I motorcycle on the cheap.

As for the fun police, I stick within a few kilometres of the speed limits and can still amuse myself around a few of the corners up Mt Mee. But I am easily amused, and I am loath to contribute to QLD state government coffers any more than I do through numerous vehicle registrations.
 

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Hi Muzza.

There is a lot of good information on the net about the SV so adding to it was my aim. Just today I took the stator cover off the bike to see if the magnets on the flywheel rotor had 'migrated'. They have not so I have left sleeping dogs lie and put the cover back on without slapping JB Weld between the magnets.
I live in D'Aguilar just N of Brisbane. D'Aguilar is at the base of curvy hotmix climb to Mt Mee. This makes owning the SV quite rewarding as they are truly fun bikes in that role as I am sure you know. I have however been riding for over 50 years so between my aversion to sliding down the road, the capabilities of the bike and modern tyres, and the speed limit on the road up the range, I come nowhere near the ragged edge these days.
The problem detailed above did seriously have me entertaining parting out the fuel injected SV1000 and buying a carburettor equipped SV650 'curvy' (1999-2002) or even a gen 2 GSX750F with its carbs, gravity fed fuel and oil cooling. Namely, I was willing to sacrifice power for simplicity. But the SV has been forgiven - for now at least.
Krad we have a lot in common I am obviously of similar vintage and thoughts.

I have 2 naked Suzuki's Sv650 and Sv1000 both 2005 low kilometres. I only ride for fun now sunny days and not on long weekends.

Both bikes have aftermarket suspension and exhausts. You can't own a twin and not share the noise.

I to live at the bottom of a bike playground, Macquarie Pass which is a favourite for Wollongong riders and those that live on the south side of Sydney.

Look forward to seeing some photos of your mount and some more stories, Happy ones of course.
 

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Ride every day to work...rain hail or shine....ad i mean, even when the big wet was on.......
Down on the GC, up Tambo......
 
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Ride every day to work...rain hail or shine....ad i mean, even when the big wet was on.......
Down on the GC, up Tambo......
Missing Link, definitely deserve a medal, yes in my younger days my bike was the only mode of transport, now I am spoilt for choice and being retired generally can plan around bad weather.

I think all those on this site are thankful for your time, energy, experience and knowledge. I think like all forums there are a few guys who really do help the rest of us survive. Cheers hope to cross your path one day and have a beer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Krad we have a lot in common I am obviously of similar vintage and thoughts.

I have 2 naked Suzuki's Sv650 and Sv1000 both 2005 low kilometres. I only ride for fun now sunny days and not on long weekends.

Both bikes have aftermarket suspension and exhausts. You can't own a twin and not share the noise.

I to live at the bottom of a bike playground, Macquarie Pass which is a favourite for Wollongong riders and those that live on the south side of Sydney.

Look forward to seeing some photos of your mount and some more stories, Happy ones of course.
I will be leaving the plastic and the steering damper off my SV for a week or so until I am sure I have solved the bike's issues but will post a pic when it is all back together. My SV was modified by an earlier owner with whom I have regular contact. He is a mechanical engineer and ex motorcycle racer to boot. He actually rode and spannered in a team for which Mal Campbell rode. It has had front suspension work done and a Hagon rear shock was installed. An aftermarket steering damper was fitted and it had a full Yoshi system but I have gone back to OEM mufflers as the Yoshi's were a bit noisy for me. I actually think the standard mufflers improve the bottom end where I do the vast majority of my riding anyway. My bike is higher k's (just over 80k now) but I picked it up for $2,400 with a noisy clutch ('chudder'). The basket was sent off for the vibefreev treatment in the UK which fixed that well documented SV1000 problem. Mechanically, the SV motors, both 1000cc and 650cc, are bulletproof if maintained as I am sure you know, with many mid-100k examples still on the road.
As for stories, there is not a rider alive without shed-load of stories to tell, both good and bad.
 

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I will be leaving the plastic and the steering damper off my SV for a week or so until I am sure I have solved the bike's issues but will post a pic when it is all back together. My SV was modified by an earlier owner with whom I have regular contact. He is a mechanical engineer and ex motorcycle racer to boot. He actually rode and spannered in a team for which Mal Campbell rode. It has had front suspension work done and a Hagon rear shock was installed. An aftermarket steering damper was fitted and it had a full Yoshi system but I have gone back to OEM mufflers as the Yoshi's were a bit noisy for me. I actually think the standard mufflers improve the bottom end where I do the vast majority of my riding anyway. My bike is higher k's (just over 80k now) but I picked it up for $2,400 with a noisy clutch ('chudder'). The basket was sent off for the vibefreev treatment in the UK which fixed that well documented SV1000 problem. Mechanically, the SV motors, both 1000cc and 650cc, are bulletproof if maintained as I am sure you know, with many mid-100k examples still on the road.
As for stories, there is not a rider alive without shed-load of stories to tell, both good and bad.
Krad, yes I have also done the clutch mod with sharealike in England. Full Yoshi system, did you try the db killer inserts? Make it much tamer without losing the twin burble. I have a Yoshi twin bolt on system which I replaced with a M4 full system but have used the db killers in both. If you don't have one I would be happy for you to try it with one of my Yoshi db killers. They make the system quieter while also giving some back pressure to improve the bottom end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Muzza, I did make up a set of db killers for the Yoshi's which did quieten the exhaust system a little but it was still a little loud for my taste. The standard system is not exactly quiet either but being able to point to the Suzy part number should me out of harms way with Mr Plod. Although it has not occurred at Mt Mee, Mt Glorious has had defects handed out for non-OEM mufflers. Thank you for the offer however.
 
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