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Hardcore Spas
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Hehe, sure...

The 520 kit came from ebay as well (user 'moto-heaven') in an auction similar to this one http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=4511779064&category=35600 . I think mine was 130-something after shipping. All the info for the chain/sprockets is in that link.

The lines are Galfer, which I bought from an Oregon distributor (www.revlimiterracing.com). They goofed up my shipping address, but the lady there was beyond helpful in trying to get my order sorted out. The kit was specific for 03-04 Suzuki SV1000-S, and I believe their part # was FK003D443. However, they offer the lines in a fairly wide vareity of colors (check www.galferusa.com for the tech specs and such), so I don't know if that particular # is color specific. Check out their site, they have all sorts of neat stuff.

Cheers :beer:

PS I can still use the rear brake like that... It's not $70+ worth of inconvenience to me.
 

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spasonatwin said:
....

Yea TLRman, the disc was moving fore/aft on the buttons. I'll remember the deal about the brembos though for future reference. But, why would you want more play (side to side, not fore/aft) in the buttons on a pair of rotors?

......

Cheers :beer:
Brembo makes 2 types of rotors, many brake companies do. There are Semi Floating which are standard on almost all bikes regardless of country of origin. There are a few exceptions to that. The Semi Floating are Stainless Steel. There are also full floating that are cast iron. The fully floating rotors are obvious even rolling around the garage they flop and rattle as the wheel turns.
The fully floating have a better chance of self aligning to the caliper/pads and also have an easier time expanding and contracting than the semi floating. The cast iron has a higher coefficient of friction. The additional braking power is minimal but a good thing, unfortunately the noise would be intolerable for most riders. The cast brakes are also sensitive to pad choice, no HH pads on the rotor or the rotor will wear away.

Charlie
 

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Hardcore Spas
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882 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Dual-Star Heated Grips

This one turned out to be a surprise mod; Dirpnirptik wanted a set, and I figured I'd get in on it to make the shipping. They were 28.oo USD a set, so I figured "what the hell?" and made it a double. I ordered them from http://www.dual-star.com/index2/Rider/heated_grip_kit.htm , and they shipped them promptly and cheaply. I understand from Dirp that these particular grips can be found almost anyplace... and even under a few different names. They come with:

1) A 3 position (low, hi, and off) switch... depending on the kit you get.
2) 2 adhesive backed electrical heat pads that go under your existing grips with a few feet of nicely shrink wrapped wire appiece
3) 4-5 Zip ties
4) 1 vampire wire tap, with about 15 inches of yellow hot wire
5) 4 contacts for the wire to switch connections (loose... have to crimp or soldier yourself)

Installation: I spent an extra hour and a half making this job clean and nearly undetectable, but it could possibly be done in 30-45 minutes. The big bitch is getting the grips off (they go back on quite easily), and then making all the wiring look neat. They recommend that you 'tap' into a headlight for the voltage, and ground any place that is tidy. While I didn't like the idea at first, the system claims that it does not draw enough power to mess with the lights (and they are correct)... and you also don't run the risk of draining your battery (if you wanted to wire them to a constant hot) that way if you forget to turn them off. They recommend you wire up a 4-5 amp fuse, but they don't provide that. The headlight has a fuse, so that was that. I wired everything through or on the existing clip-on control wires, down through the frame, and over to the left side of the fairing. You have to leave a little on the throttle side showing (so you can twist the grip...), but is not noticable if you do it right. The switch a mounted to the left side access panel: nice, clean, and easy to replace if you so desire. Overall, I put a lot more effort into it than you have to, but it looks really clean.

Verdict: Bastards. First, the switch is backwards. On low, both pins get the 12V, but on high only one gets 12V. I can forgive that I suppose. Second, they take a bit of time to warm up. If you're going any short distance it is a bit of a waste. Lastly, they just aren't warm enough. The throttle grip gets just warm enough for your hand to be unpleasant in 30F-50F weather, while the clutch hand is lukewarm at best. I'm wearing some bad ass insulated gloves (read: Icon TiMax Gauntlets), and the left fingers still hurt a bit after more than 4 miles. It's nice to have a warm right hand, but the sort of semi-death-grip you develop trying to keep your fingers warm is a bad habit.... and you're still better off grabbing the radiator with your left hand. If the left grip were as warm as the right, I wouldn't bitch half as much. Mind you, I have them wired up right, and they perform about the same, if not worse, on Dirp's FZ6.

I suppose this kit would be nice if you just wanted warmer fingers for 55F-70F riding, but any colder is going to require something better. I really want those few hours of my life back... I put effort into making all that wiring invisible. Caveat Emptor.

Cheers :beer:

PS Pictures are forthcoming... give me a few on those.
 

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Hardcore Spas
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
RaceTech Springs and 10wt Oil

Ok, this was done a while back, but I forgot to write it up.

I went ahead and ordered the .90 springs (or maybe .95.... can't remember off the top of my head) and went to 10wt oil. I wanted to use 7.5, but I couldn't find any, nor could I find 5 & 10 of the same brand anywhere.... damn small town stores :(

Installation: I've had my forks off a few times now, so it went pretty smooth. However, I was on my lunch hour at the shop and rushed the job a bit too much...... and ended up sctratching my paint with the clip-ons. That pissed me off something fierce :pistols: , but can be avoided by wrapping the clip-ons SEVERAL times in a thick cloth/towel so they can rest against the fairing without damaging it. I used several cans of Electrical Contact Cleaner (no carb spray... it leaves a residue) on the forks, spraying it inside until all the fluid ran out clear. Then I hung them upside-down to dry for a few minutes... a good time to grease/clean your front end I'd say. The springs themselves are a direct replacement: no fiddling or fabricating to make it perfect. That, and RaceTech provides a shitload of washers (and stickers for your toolbox, too) if you manage to lose the stockers. I measured the fork oil height a few MM lower than stock to try and make up for it being 10wt instead of 7.5.... I want to say about 5-7MM more than stock. Did I mention the springs just look and feeeel so much nicer than the OEM crap?

Verdict: Very, very nice. Static sag/height is awesome with just about no damn preload dialed in at all. The fluid made a huge difference. I now have MUCH more range in the adjusters (you can dial the rebound damping in enough to make the fork damn near stick, but still dial it out enough to make almost feel un-damped).... it was like the stock adjustments only worked on the first turn or two from full stiff. Now it feels like half a turn DOES something to the handling. :niceone: At first I just set it all in the middle and rode around for a few days, and it felt slightly better than stock. After that, I took an afternoon on a fairly high speed twisty road (with bumps, eleveation and pavement changes, and all that good stuff) and a little screwdriver.... it has really dialed in nicely. This, with the stock GSXR rear shock, has got rid of any rear-end wallow, and seriously reduced headshake while exiting really bumby crap hard on the throttle. Braking feels a bit better too... I can crank down a bit harder without the forks bottoming :D And every time it gets hotter, the suspension just works better and better. We had some 80 degree days here, and the thing just felt like it was on rails.

100% endorse this mod (110% with the GSXR 1K rear shock as well). It does make the bike feel stiffer, but strangley no where near as harsh when thrashed, even on shitty pavement. Give it a try if you haven't already, you don't know what you're missing. ;)

Cheers :beer:
 

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Hardcore Spas
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
EMGO Aluminum Footpegs

Saw these up on Ebay for about 24 bucks, and said, "What the Hell, why not?" You can get them in a variety of anodized colors as well.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/e...tem=4547171520&category=35580&sspagename=WDVW

Instalation: It would seem simple, but so does math at first. The stock dowel from the old pegs is re-used with these, and mine were a mm or so to large; I'm guessing that the coating on the new pegs is what causes the interference. I reamed the new peg holes a few times with a drill press (you could just roll up sand paper or use a rat tailed file to do the same thing), and cleaned off the dowels, and they tapped in pretty firmly with a hammer... though woe is you if you forget to/miss-install the spring before you do. ;) The pegs are actually 2 pieces... the footrest portion is screwed into the pivoting portion via a hex key that they don't provide. You really have to tighten the shit out of it to to keep the footrest from turning, and I'd even use locktight if you have some.

Verdict: Not too shabby at all. They look clean, feel nice, have more ground clearance (though if you need that on an '03 SV1K S model, you are a nutter) and have good grip for even my now-flat-soled-combat-boots. They are a bit lighter than the stock assembly, but I didn't notice any more vibration from them whatsoever. I will be going on a looong trip this weekend, and will report back if they do buzz your feet over long distances. It's a shame that installation was no where near as easy as it should have been. Not impossible at all, just sort of irritating.

Cheers :beer:
 

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Hardcore Spas
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882 Posts
Spears Cable Clutch Conversion

Being well pissed off about the friction point of the clutch for some time now (and having the slave cylinder leak a resevior worth of fluid per month), I finaly put down for Spears Enterprise's cable clutch conversion http://www.spearsenterprises.com/products.html . I'd also like to give a shout out to the company itself: The guy was helpfull, prompt with phone calls (a company called me BACK for once, what a change), and a straight shooter about his product. I will do buisness with him again for sure.

Cable clutch conversion:
Installation: Before I bought it, the guy told me that installation would require the permanent removal of the sprocket cover (thus, no speedo). This isn't really a big deal on race bikes, but I need to keep track of my miles for services and such. I took the plunge anyway, figuring I (in my infinite wsidom :ph34r: ) could make it work. It was not easy. Not even a little bit. Removing the old hydraulic clutch line is a pain in the ass, and routing the new cable is a real pain in the nuts. After unbolting the rectifier (sp?) and moving crap around, I finally got it where it would work. You also have to remove the bar end, grip, and switches on that clip-on to slide the new perch on. on top of that, you have to put smaller "spade connectors" to adapt to wires to the new clutch switch.

If you leave the sprocket cover off, it is a very simple job... all the hardware & spacers are supplied with the kit, and it goes on like it was made to be there. If you want to run the sprocket cover as well, get a six pack of beer and but out the dremel...... you're going to be there for a while. You have to enlarge one window an inch or so, and completely cut out the section that he old slave cylinder used to occupy. A few more cuts & grinds make it fit, but it's a real motherf^*%er if you don't know what you're doing. If anyone wants to attempt this, PM me, and I'll send you a diagram of exactly what you need to do.

Verdict: Yeesss!!! I can adjust my clutch again!!!! And the lever pull isn't bad at all (though, I don't think the stock pull is bad either). No more leaking cylinders, no more dis-colored fluid. Action is smooth, linear, and quick. It feels a bit funky at first, as it takes less lever travel to fully engage/disengage the clutch now... but I think that's a good thing. Worth evey penny, if you ask me.

BUT, there are a few gripes here. There were no instructions, and there could have been a few things added to the kit that would have rounded it out nicely. It came with the perch, switch, lever, cable, and 'slave cylinder' (actuator, maybe?), but no little rubber cover for the free-play adjuster, no electrical connectors for the new switch, and no cap or cover for the new slave (went down to the harware store and picked up a 1" rubber cap, filled it with grease, and put that on to cover it: worked great). And did I mention it was a real pain in the ass to modify the sprocket cover? It's really sold as a 'race bike' part.... and as that it is a 10/10. As a street bike part, you need to put quite a bit of effort to make it right.

I'm very happy with it, and recommend it to anyone who is tired of the hydraulic bullshit.... and brave enough to wield power tools :D

Cheers :beer:
 

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Hardcore Spas
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882 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
1/5 Turn Throttle Tube

While I was at the clutch thing, I ordered a 1/5th turn throttle tube & grip from Spears. The thing comes as an assembly: one tube with the handgrip already glued on.

Installation: Too easy... gotta love suzuki stuff sometimes. Once the bar end comes off, the cable housing comes off with 2 cross-head screws. It pulls off neatly in two pieces, and you can remove the cables from the tube in seconds... and the tube slides right off. Installation is the just the opposite of removal (makes sure to put the cables back in the right holders... not to difficult if you pay attention when you take it off). It's not a bad idea to smear some lube on the clip-on before you slide the new tube on, and shoot some lube down the throttle cables when you have the housing off. No instructions provided, but none needed, really

Verdict: :surprise: :shocking: :wacko: :banana: :punk: No lie, it only takes a 1/5th turn (a little less really, I'd reckon) to go from closed to WFO. It suddenly feels like I have 15 more hp from 3K-8K RPM, and throttle control can be an issue rolling out of slow corners (Gary McCoy, anyone?). Once you get used to it though, holy shit is it cool. By far the coolest 25 bucks I've spent on a comfort mod. Not having to re-grip or twist so damn far for full throttle is FUN, as well as a lot less taxing on the wrist and forearm. However, the throttle is "stiffer". ie: it takes more force to twist it all the way open. It's smooth and linear, and snaps shut like a champ, but requires slightly more effort to turn. I think this is really a survival mechanism built in for free.... it makes it more difficult to imput too much throttle on accident (say, over a bump or shifting body position).

I may get used to it over time, and it surely won't be as cool then, but it feels like a fresh bike now with these two things done. Yee Haw.

Cheers :beer:

PS If you guys want pictures, just shout... I have to get new camera batteries.
 
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